H is for Hope

in truth

in her youth

she burned

her rhythms changed

with the seasons

as they later changed

tic tok tic tok

time

or was it?

#

They all had hope they said

grow straight

bend to love

understand life is not easy

nor meant to be

let your mouth bleed

before you speak of anger

close your eyes

to blind the world to your foolish thoughts

#

listen

listen

listen

to

others

#

for you have naught

of consequence

#

listen

listen

listen

#

she did

#

’til

her mouth filled

and spilled the blood of anger

#

’til

her lashes rose

and her thoughts flew

to touch the soft

clouds underbelly

#

tic

tok

her lips blood red

smile

#

listen

listen

listen

#

she watches

the sound of dew splatting

the morning sun’s heat

drowns her in it’s aroma

of colour

#

light

a formless key turning

her lips blood red

she smiles

#

#

Written for ABC Wednesday – have a peek at how other people see the letter H.

Also submitted to dVerse – Poets Pub – Open Link Night – Week 8

For some great poetry, call in for a drink and a read.

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Author: Jo Bryant

I was born in the land of Banjo Paterson, gum trees, and weather extremes. I am a freelance writer. I live in the Bay of Plenty, New Zealand, but still like to claim my Australian heritage. I graduated with a Bachelor of Communications in 2008. I am writing my first novel. I love to write poetry, short stories, and also write for the web. And there is nothing that is on a par with a sunny summer's day spent at Waihi Beach.

68 thoughts on “H is for Hope”

          1. For God’s sake man – don’t break a hip – LMAO – I’ll never get over the guilt – that’s another thing I know about – guilt. Hmmmmmmm – perhaps a poem is on its way. LOL

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  1. Sometimes it’s better to let rip and say what you need to say rather than keep it all bottled up the way she did and have blood red lips from biting her tongue and holding her peace. Very, very vivid imagery, poor woman.

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  2. Very efficient use of the words and spaces, all assembled on the page in a dramatic spill like the words of the “she” described by the narrator. This definitely has an explosive quality, a lot of pent up frustration–a very ‘red’ poem in feel, and definitely one that should be ‘read’ as well. Enjoyed it much.

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    1. A poem can be about the simplest of things – these are often the most honest accounts – and they touch others. So don’t knock your poem about a horse ride – celebrate it. 🙂

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  3. I loved reading this. “let your mouth bleed before you speak of anger” ~ Wow! As a southerner raised to be a proper young lady, do I ever identify with that! Your use of words is powerful. I look forward to reading more of your work.

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  4. This is great, Jo. I love all the compressed meanings. I totally agree with the comment above about the line ‘let your mouth bleed before you speak of anger’. That’s very powerful imagery and says so much. (Loved ‘formless key’ too.) I also really like the question left hanging ‘ Or was it?’ – that’s very effective. Perhaps answered at the end by a powerful smile? Wonderful. I’d be very interested to know how you work – do you write and re-write a lot? Or do some poems and lines just ‘write themselves’?

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    1. I have no method. Maybe I am strange in that. Some things I write and put away to be reworked, looked at again after I have managed to distance myself from the work. I get very attached to some of these babies (words). That makes it hard to be critical – so I need some space, then when I look at them again I can see more clearly what works/what doesn’t. At least I hope that is the case. Other times they seem to write themselves. I am actually surprised when I look down and see what has appeared before me on paper or on the computer screen. I wrote a piece called Colin Arthur Bryant and the third child like that. It started out because I was thinking of Dad on his 102nd birthday. I looked down and there it was – I did not edit or change a word. That doesn’t happen often though – mostly I edit, re-edit, then edit some more. Ahhhhhhhhhh – a writers life. 🙂

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  5. a unique look at anger and especially how society encourages woman in particular to “just grin and bear it” – some of us just can’t do that and when we do it is not a healthy thing. great poem

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    1. Never read him until now – just found “Balm in Gilead” – WOW – you did too you little borrower you !!!!!!!!!!!!! 🙂 Need to find more now. Thank you for the introduction. Oh how I love the way poetry finds us.

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  6. At first It reminded me of Cat Stevens Father and Son, but then it soon morphed into a wild ride a million times better. with fire, sky, and water. my eyes could see and my ears could hear. I think this is my new favorite now.

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    1. Awwwwww – thanks Sara. I love your comment – it made my day – I have to say that this will be one of my favourites – I know it’s like choosing a fav among your children – but some just worm their way into you – this poem has done that to me. 🙂

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